Classes

Hands on Training

IMPORTANT NOTICE

All hands-on-training classes have specific REQUIREMENTS. All potential students should review the requirements for their chosen class below. If you do not have access to the appropriate equipment, please contact us ahead of time by calling 316-268-4485 during regular business hours or emailing cshirley@wichita.gov and we will see what we can do to assist you. We will not be able to accommodate those who arrive unprepared the day of the event and those without the appropriate equipment cannot participate for safety reasons.

At minimum, all hands-on students MUST have completed and brought with them the following: Live Release Form. This form will need to be signed by both an appropriate officer from your organization and yourself. You will be asked to turn it in when checking in on Saturday.

 

Engine Company Operations

Keith Niemann, Jonathan Hall, Sid Newby, Members of WFD Engine Company 10/B and 10/C

SOLD OUT

The fire service begins and ends with engine company fundamentals. This class will offer various methods of handling the deployment and application of hoselines at fire scenes as well as provide valuable insights from experienced engine company officers. You will be taught various techniques for both 1 3/4" and 2 1/2" attack lines, drawing on the teachings and experience of many different fire service instructors. Students will be shown ways for overcoming understaffed engines, common pitfalls and tips for excellent teamwork on the fire ground. The live fire portion of this class also allows students to interface with those performing other operations.

REQUIREMENTS:

  • Live Release Form
  • Full Turnout Gear
  • Structural Helmet
  • Structural Gloves
  • SCBA w/ Additional Cylinder

CLASS LOCATION: Wichita Fire Regional Training Center - 4780 E 31st South, Wichita

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Beyond the Basics - Advanced Engine Ops

Trey Nelms, Daniel Nelms, Shawn Raymond, Jonathan Jarvis

SOLD OUT

Today’s Engine Companies are often staffed with fewer members and given more tasks, which often lessen the priority of fire suppression. For many, going to a fire has become a low frequency event. While many Fire Departments routinely take care of the “room and contents” fire, how does your unit perform when the actions required go beyond the basics? This hands-on class is not “cookie cutter”. It will allow students to practice and refine both their engine company skills and fireground decision making. We will explore the “what if’s”, challenge the actions you must know… but don’t perform often, and push you out of your Engine Company “comfort zone”. Getting water on the fire makes all of our other problems go away. It’s the one thing we must do on every fire. We will discuss the “hows” and “whys” of various techniques, and use them in our drills to improve your future operations as an engine company member. Some people consider Engine work to be “simple”. Come join us, where we’ll help you fine-tune your existing skills, add some new ones, and make those “basics” look advanced.

REQUIREMENTS:

  • Live Release Form
  • Full Turnout Gear
  • Structural Helmet
  • Structural Gloves
  • SCBA w/ Additional Cylinder

CLASS LOCATION: TBA

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Firefighter Survival

Trevor Steedman, Bobby Magee, Ray McCormack

SOLD OUT

This Hands-on-Training course will discuss and practice avoiding and overcoming common dangers on the Fire Ground. Wires and entanglement, wall breaching, reduced profile and through the floor are some of the obstacles that will be covered in this course. Students will participate in self-survival as well as rescue our own before RIT can be deployed. Students will be able to learn all the techniques necessary before practicing them in real world scenarios.

REQUIREMENTS:

  • Live Release Form
  • Full Turnout Gear
  • Structural Helmet
  • Structural Gloves
  • SCBA w/ Additional Cylinder

CLASS LOCATION: TBA

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Tactical Extrication

Isaac Frazier, Josh Griffin

SOLD OUT

This class provides a realistic “street” approach to training that’s been forged on the nation’s deadliest roadways. This program hits many important and high-probability scenarios including side-resting vehicles, side outs, various alternative dash displacements, steering wheel de-ringing, guardrail entrapments, various tips, and much more. When we understand the "whys" of each method, we can understand the "hows" when Plan A doesn't work. Regardless of your staffing or equipment, this program is for you. It has been proven that when lives hang in the balance, quick thinking can mean life or death.

REQUIREMENTS:

  • Live Release Form
  • LKQ Waiver Form
  • Full Turnout Gear
  • Structural or Rescue Rated Helmet
  • Structural or Extrication Gloves
  • Eye Protection
  • Hearing Protection

CLASS LOCATION: LKQ Pick Your Part - 700 E 21st St N, Wichita

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Realistic Fireground Forcible Entry

Cameron Meier, Nick White

SOLD OUT

Every assignment on the fire ground can only be performed after we obtain entry into the structure. As American’s have become more security conscious, the ability to perform proper forcible entry has become more critical than ever. Forcible entry can be one of the most challenging tasks to perform and even more challenging to train on. Knowing this bread and butter techniques will be reviewed, understood, and the why's explained. Time on the tool is paramount and a majority of the day will be spent in scenarios that can be immediately applied to the fire ground.

REQUIREMENTS:

  • Live Release Form
  • Full Turnout Gear
  • Structural Helmet
  • Structural Gloves
  • Eye Protection
  • Hearing Protection
  • SCBA

CLASS LOCATION: Wichita Fire Department Station 2 - 1240 S Broadway St, Wichita

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Rural Fire Tactics

Dan Mishler, Seth Glaves, Ray Hensley

SOLD OUT

This class is designed to give the first due engine company options for fire attack at an incident where there is either with no hydrant or an unexpected out of service hydrant. We will cover options for rural fire attack and the use of tenders to supplement water. We will cover different hose load options, gallons per second vs gallons per minute, confinement vs extinguishment, limitations with pre-connected lines, and discuss obstacles in suburban and rural settings such as narrow drives and overcoming long and short setbacks. This course will give the firefighters solid hands-on experience under live fire conditions.

REQUIREMENTS:

  • Live Release Form
  • Full Turnout Gear
  • Structural Helmet
  • Structural Gloves
  • Eye Protection
  • SCBA

CLASS LOCATION: Acquired Structure - Douglass, KS

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Street Smart Rescue

Chad Winton

SOLD OUT

The Technical Rescue world has made great strides over the years in regards to equipment and tactics used to mitigate emergencies involving high risk-low frequency call types. With all the advancements some could argue that we have become too “technical” in Technical Rescue. This hands-on class will take the participant through a fast paced series of “real world” scenarios that place an emphasis on “safely and quickly getting the job done” utilizing basic equipment and rescue tactics that have been around for years and have stood the test of time. This track focuses on skills that add more “tools to the tool box” for the rescuer who finds themselves in situations requiring quick action but with limited equipment and manpower. Topics to be covered include patient removal above/below grade; stabilization (vehicle/structural); using non-technical rescue personnel in the rescue operation; non-conventional use of conventional fire ground tools in the rescue world; simple rope systems; lifting and moving heavy objects; and much more.

REQUIREMENTS:

  • Live Release Form
  • Full Turnout Gear
  • Structural Helmet
  • Structural Gloves
  • SCBA w/ Additional Cylinder
  • Eye Protection
  • Hearing Protection

CLASS LOCATION: Wichita Fire Regional Training Center - 4780 E 31st South, Wichita

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Truck Company Operations

Scott Kleinschmidt, Sam Hittle, Brian Jetton, Seth Taylor, Chris Moren, Nick Sequenzia, Michael Heeney, Tim Vandermeer, Members of WFD Truck Company 1/C, 2/B, and 3/A

SOLD OUT

This fast paced hands on course will take the participant through best practices in street level Truck Company Operations that focuses on the reality, not “theory”, when it comes to sound tactics in Forcible Entry, Roof Operations, Ground Ladders, and Search Operations. Tactics that fit into any department deployment model and within individual apparatus staffing levels. Within a low student to instructor ratio you will learn proven tips and tricks from guys that do it and not just teach it. If you are looking to challenge your skill set and take it to the next level this course is for you.

REQUIREMENTS:

  • Live Release Form
  • Full Turnout Gear
  • Structural Helmet
  • Structural Gloves
  • SCBA w/ Additional Cylinder
  • Eye Protection
  • Hearing Protection

CLASS LOCATION: TBA

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Lectures

360° Leadership

Trevor Steedman

360° Leadership is a core class for Officer and Firefighter professional development. This course explores and explains the essentials of well-rounded organizational leadership and the obligations of all ranks and levels of membership.

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Decision Making Under Stress

David Rhodes

Over the past 2 decades researchers have discovered differences in how the brain works during decision making. This course can be considered decision making 101 and serves as a great introduction in how our brain operates in both low and high stress environments. Having this core knowledges helps understand the processes needed to improve situational awareness for yourself and your crewmembers. Naturalistic, Heuristic, Recognition Prime, Flow and the OODA Loop decision making process are discussed in context of day to day situations and emergency high stress low time situations.

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Extreme Ownership in the Fire Service 2.0

Jonathan Jarvis

Extreme ownership in the fire service is about taking responsibility for everything in your world, from the smallest thing like a clean station to getting a properly hooked-up water supply . With a positive attitude and a properly trained skill set there isn’t a task that you can’t accomplish on the fire ground. This is a class that will teach you how to be the most successful firefighter that you possibly can be. I’ve compiled a list of information from 20+ senior members of the WFD and other departments across the country on what they think a solid firefighter should know. This class will cover everything from why attention to detail is important, to proper eating and fitness and how to conduct search and rescue operations.

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The Extrication Battle Plan

Isaac Frazier

Whether you run one entrapment a year or hundreds, the citizens we serve expect performance at the highest level. The latest national study (2016) reported 37,461 fatalities from vehicle crashes. Vehicle extrication is the most “common” technical call type, although nationally it is widely misunderstood. Many instructors mistakenly place the #1 emphasis on tools instead of focusing on YOU (the operator). The Extrication Battle Plan will provide you with many street proven tactics/scenarios to prepare you for your next extrication, where the knowledge and skills learned will one day translate over to the streets, determining life or death.

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Firefighter Roundtable

Ray McCormack, Bobby Magee, Trevor Steedman

Over the past 2 decades researchers have discovered differences in how the brain works during decision making. This course can be considered decision making 101 and serves as a great introduction in how our brain operates in both low and high stress environments. Having this core knowledges helps understand the processes needed to improve situational awareness for yourself and your crewmembers. Naturalistic, Heuristic, Recognition Prime, Flow and the OODA Loop decision making process are discussed in context of day to day situations and emergency high stress low time situations.

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Fireground Physics

Jeremiah Connell

This class will provide the "why" and "how" of the skills and techniques we use on the fireground. By having a basic understanding of the laws of physics we can be more efficient with our fireground functions. We will go over the basics of forces around us and how we apply them, body mechanics and the use of the tools of the trade.

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High-Rise Tactics

Aaron Eastland

High-rise fires can be the most challenging incidents for any fire department. With today’s light weight construction and expanding population high-rises are being developed further from downtown. It seems now most suburban and even rural cities have a hotel, apartment complex, hospital, big box, or other occupancy that will challenge your departments resources. For many departments this is a new challenge and unfamiliar incident. This class will discuss high-rise tactics and strategies used at a traditional high-rise beginning with size-up and ending with HVAC operations. Other topics include elevator operations and control, stairwell designation and ventilation, command and control, tactical priorities and much more. The information provided will assist in developing and improving your departments strategies, tactics, and policies.

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Making the Most Out of Roof Operations

Dennis Walton

Roof Operations can be one of the most hazards operations on the fireground, yet it is one of the most important assignments. Ventilation allows the chemicals, smoke and heat to be evacuated out of the structure making interior operations safer for firefighters, and it buys precious moments for any victims that may still be trapped inside. As a firefighter assigned to the roof, we must keep our mind open to our operations, roof construction, access to and egress from the roof, tools and available, and how we will perform the details of our task. These important task will be discussed during an interactive lecture.

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Motivation in Training: Let's Get It Back

Scott Peterson

This class was developed and designed to help fire departments both large and small to help overcome the lack of motivation in their training. So many times regardless if we are a paid firefighter or a volunteer firefighter we find any “excuse” not to attend training. This class identifies why we do not train, and how we can look at some options to get motivated to attend training, be productive at training, and help our fellow brothers and sisters to become motivated to train. It also looks at the reason why we need to train and the results if we don’t. This is an interactive class getting to know the students and the issues in their own departments. We will use class participation, video, and even use our emotions as a motivator. Someone once asked me do I have a quote to live by as an instructor, I gave it some thought and a few weeks later I had one..."Let no mountain change the outcome of a person's success."

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New Company Officer - Must Do's

Trey Nelms

What are we doing to prepare new or future Company Officers? Many are promoted with no preparation and given little to no direction. This class focuses on the new Company Officer’s “Must Do’s”, which set the stage for individual and company success. Attendees will learn to navigate the transition to “designated adult” and prepare themselves for their new roles and responsibilities.

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Rockstars vs Downers - War to Win the Middle

Brad Clark

As leaders, we have a natural tendency to focus attention on the high and low performers in our organizations. When this happens, we often overlook the largest group of firefighters, The Middle. They are waiting to be lead, up or down. This class helps to re-direct the focus onto that group, and will enable us to guide those people to success. Theory, Experience and a combination of both will be illustrated and paired with first hand leadership experience from the military and fire department to provide students with a better platform with which to move forward in helping co-workers and/or employees to reach for higher levels of performance.

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Say Yes to VES

Kevin Lewis

Yes, VES can be a challenge but if not you, then who? The Fire Department mission is life safety and we must prepare ourselves for this such incident. Limited staffing, building construction, coupled with recent scientific data are all forcing us to reevaluate methods we have used for decades. Vent Enter Search is no different. To be the best Fire Service Professionals we can, we must fully understand fire dynamics as they relate to VES. This will allow us to operate as safely as possible while providing the maximum level of proficiency upholding our primary mission. Life Safety. The course will cover VES history, VES size up, evaluating risk/need for VES, specific step by step how to techniques, and when and where aspects of VES.

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Setting the Tone for Success

Daniel Nelms

In today’s fire service, we each face multiple issues on the fire ground. Reduced manpower, ever changing building materials and contents, “new” firefighting techniques, and the constantly changing equipment we are issued. There is no such thing as a “cookie cutter” answer in the fire service. No one line can be used for every fire, every time. No one person should decide what goes on a rig. Your preparedness for the area you cover, the citizens you serve, and the abilities of your members determines it all. This course will give participants “options” for success. Regardless if every seat on the rig is full, or you’re running with 1 person, paid, combination, or 100% volunteer, we’ve got something for you. In this class, we will discuss:

  • Pre-Incident Surveying
  • Engine Company Riding Assignments
  • Hoseline set-up
  • Hoseline and Nozzle Selection
  • Making the Stretch
  • Supply Line Options
  • Out of the Box Techniques
Some people consider Engine work to be “simple”. Come join us, where we’ll help fine-tune existing skills, add some new ones, and perform until we make those “basics” look advanced.

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Unconventional Engine Company Tactics

Jonathan Hall

Prompt deployment of the first handline is paramount to the success of any fireground. In the urban fire environment, it may not be as simple as stretching through the front door of a dwelling. Engine Companies must have tactics available to them to rapidly adapt to any situation they may face. This course will cover tactics for fires ranging from alley garages to high-rise apartments. Topics will include reverse lays, leader lines/long lays, bundles, lines over ladders, rope stretches, and standpipe operations.

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Event Coordinator

Firefighter Dan McElroy

wichitahot@gmail.com

Wichita Fire Liaison

Deputy Chief Joseph Bickel

jbickel@wichita.gov

FOOLS of Oz Liaison

Captain Keith Niemann

kniemann@wichita.gov

Questions/Group Registration

Admin Aide II Colleen Shirley

Available Monday - Friday: 7:30AM - 4:30PM
cshirley@wichita.gov
(316) 268-4485 Office
Wichita Fire Department
455 N Main St 11th Floor
Wichita, KS 67202

Wichita HOT Board

  • Battalion Chief Sid Newby
  • Captain Michael Crosby
  • Captain Kelly Ross
  • Lieutenant Mark Misek
  • Lieutenant Stephen Runyan
  • Firefighter Wade Holle
  • Firefighter Jonathan Jarvis
  • Firefighter Josh Griffin

Interested in Teaching?

Are you interested in teaching a class at Wichita HOT 2019? Submit A Class Proposal
Deadline for 2019 is February 1st. Thank you!